Batteries

1. Zinc air batteries are ideal for hearing aids. With a unique construction that utilizes air from outside the battery, these batteries pack maximum energy into each cell. Using zinc air batteries in your hearing aid will give you clearer tones, fewer volume adjustments, and fewer battery replacements.

2. Zinc air batteries uses air as a source of power, and the tab provides a seal that ensures freshness until the battery is ready for use. To activate the battery, simply remove the tab, wait one minute to allow air to activate the ingredients, and insert the battery into your hearing aid. (Note that replacing the tab when the battery is not in use will not extend the battery life.)

3. Battery life is determined by the type and amplification of your hearing aid, as well as the hours you wear it. Your hearing care professional can tell you the battery life to expect.

Store your hearing aid batteries at room temperature. Avoid temperature extremes, as heat will shorten the life of the batteries, and refrigeration is not recommended. Metal objects such as coins and keys can short out batteries, so don’t carry batteries your pocket or purse. Always be sure to store and discard batteries in places that cannot be reached by infants or children. 

If a battery is swallowed, see a doctor immediately.

4. The most commonly used hearing aid battery sizes are 10, 13, 312, and 675. Most manufacturers use an industry-standard color code to identify the battery size.

You may notice that different manufacturers often place different letters before or after the battery size. For instance, 13A or R13ZA may look different, but both codes represent size 13 batteries.

5. Most manufacturers will remove mercury from hearing aid batteries by June 2011. (While household batteries (such as alkaline) containing mercury were eliminated in the mid-1990s, button-cell batteries like those for hearing aids were exempt.)

 

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